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Fearless Critic restaurant review
Houston
Food
Feel
Price
8.1
8.0
$65
Latin American
Upmarket restaurant

Hours
Mon–Thu 11:00am–9:30pm
Fri 11:00am–10:30pm
Sat 11:30am–10:30pm
Sun 11:00am–9:00pm

Features Date-friendly, good wines, outdoor dining
Bar Beer, wine, liquor
Credit cards Visa, MC, AmEx
Reservations Accepted

www.cordua.com

Upper Kirby
2055 Westheimer Rd.
Houston, TX
(713) 527-8300
Hours
Mon–Thu 11:00am–9:30pm
Fri 11:00am–10:30pm
Sat 11:30am–10:30pm
Sun 10:30am–9:00pm

West Houston
9705 Westheimer Rd.
Houston, TX
(713) 952-1988
Churrascos
This first and most approachable Nuevo Latino restaurant isn’t half bad

The granddaddy of the Cordúa chain is still going strong at over twenty years old, pleasing the crowds with the same tender, if overpriced, marinated tenderloins. The décor still works, the service still works, and the whole package, however predictable it has become, still works. Sure, the food tastes like it’s made—from ingredient procurement to preparation strategy—simply to satisfy a bottom line. And the many outposts of this restaurant group, in spite of their different branding strategies, visual themes, and target markets, do a lot of the same things. We’re not just talking about the tres leches, or the fried plantain chips and chimichurri that greet you when you sit down (which are addictive). We’re also talking about the marineros, those smoky crab claws—which aren’t bad, but aren’t exactly good either. We’re also talking about the underperforming ceviche, or the mixed grill of overcooked seafood called “Opereta.”

The ubiquitous maduros (sweet roasted plantains) and yuca fries are fun and blameless. There have opened, since Churrascos first spread its Latin American message of meat in Houston, several better and more authentic churrascarias, it’s true—but we can’t downplay Cordúa’s enduring role as the first and still most approachable.

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