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Fearless Critic restaurant review
Portland
Food
Feel
Price
7.6
7.5
$10
Polish
Food cart

Hours
Mon–Fri 11:00am–6:00pm

Features Outdoor dining
Bar None
Credit cards None

Downtown
SW 10th Ave. & Alder
Portland, OR
(971) 344-3704
Euro Dish
A little yellow Polish food cart serving up one of Portland’s most transportive experiences

This jaunty buggy is, as far as we can tell, the only Polish food cart in Portland. It’s also perhaps the best in its particular food-cart zone. It’s not quite for lunch rush quickies; there’s more of a slow-food mentality here. A friendly, older Polish woman will make your food. You will wait a bit for it. And it will be so very worth it.

Some tables set up around the area are surrounded by bushes and trees, giving the whole thing a sort of pleasant village feel. You know, as far as food carts go. There are colorful pictures of all the foods you can order, so if you don’t know what Polish food entails, you won’t feel so lost.

You can play it safe with potato-and-cheese-curd pierogi, made with unleavened dough and served with a little sour cream. Get these in addition to “Hunters stew,” an absolutely soul-soothing blend of pulled pork, sausage, and sauerkraut. Bratwurst tastes correct, with a nice snap to it. Stuffed cabbage might be a little challenging for newbies—it’s mushy, but in a good way, filled with meat and spices and rice, then covered in a sweet and spicy tomato sauce. There is also wonderful schnitzel (a tender, lightly breaded, fried pork cutlet), beef goulash, chicken paprikash, and blintzes. Everything is, of course, hearty, so beware of over-ordering (it’s hard not to).

There’s something so lovely about sitting out here, next to the tiny yellow shack and smelling the cabbage and sausage, tasting the love and care put into every dish. It’s certainly the closest to Eastern Europe that you can come while standing on a Portland sidewalk.

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