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Fearless Critic restaurant review
DC
Food
Feel
Price
7.9
7.5
$10
Salvadoran
Casual restaurant

Features Kid-friendly
Bar None
Credit cards Visa, MC, AmEx
Reservations Not accepted

Silver Spring, MD
8214 Piney Branch Rd.
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 588-6656
Hours
Mon–Thu 7:00am–9:30pm
Fri 7:00am–10:30pm
Sat 8:00am–10:30pm
Sun 8:00am–8:30pm

Germantown, MD
18058 Mateny Rd.
Germantown, MD
(301) 515-8575
Hours
Mon–Thu 10:30am–9:00pm
Fri–Sat 10:30am–10:00pm
Sun 10:30am–8:00pm
La Casita Pupusería & Market
Neighborhood pupusería and market with a mix of authentic and very affordable food

This pleasant neighborhood pupusería started out as a Salvadoran market, to which they added some simple tables and chairs. It’s bright and lively enough, though there’s not much to look at. What attracts the local Hispanic crowd—and the occasional non-Hispanic person, too—are its spectacular, authentic pupusas.

These rounds of masa are top-notch, with homemade curtido that’s chopped finer than many, more like a slaw. There are the classic revueltas, with delicious chicharrón—whose crispy porkiness is hard to beat—but it’s also nice to see loroco on the menu. The unique tea-leaf flavor stands up to even the spicy slaw.

There are some concessions to American tastes and demands: “vegemixta” (refried red beans, loroco, and cheese) and “marimixta” (crabmeat, shrimp, and cheese). Unusually, the frying oil is vegetable, not lard, but it doesn’t take away from how satisfying this stuff is. Lots of things come with cuajada, which is homemade Salvadoran cheese, with a curdy consistency not unlike queso fresco. There are also quite a few egg dishes on the menu, making this a great spot for Latin brunch. Huevos con chorizo with tomato, onion, and pepper are solid, but we’re excited about the rarely seen huevos con ejote (eggs with green beans). Many of the egg dishes are actually more Mexican than Salvadoran, but there’s nothing wrong with that. We love Mexican breakfast.

You can skip the tacos, though. Enchiladas aren’t so hot, either. Desserts are unusually good, like the ayote (sweet squash) en dulce, a preserved fruit similar to Argentine membrillo. Banana empanadas are simple but tasty. Nuegados (fried yuca and cheese dumplings with cane sugar syrup)—wow. There’s also a long list of sweet drinks, both heavy (licuados, atul de elote) and light (aguas frescas, horchata).

Oh yeah, and everything is dirt-cheap here, which just warms the heart all that much more.

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